Archives for February 2010

9 Angles of Attack (part 1)

The Nine Angles of Attack are a basic numbering system that we are utilizing to make it so that two practitioners can rapidly drill and play. The utilization of the numbers are that each number is used to convey a specific angle direction and technique designation. This is so that when I say the number 1 my partner knows exactly what I mean and no further explanation is necessary.

It is also so that when we discuss where an error or problem occurred we can speak about it in terms of numbers thus saving a lot of time and energy. For example if my partner brought an angle 1 but would have been much better off to bring an angle 5 then I have stated a whole paragraph by telling them “you wanted an angle 5 on that one”.

There are many different systems that utilize different numbering systems for the angles of attack. I have found the one I am listing here to be the most useful for me as the numbering system is simple and easy for beginners to quickly learn. The angles of the angles of attack do not change if you are empty handed, if you have a knife or if you have a stick. The angles are the same regardless. The biggest difference in position if you have a knife is if you are holding the knife in a stabbing position or in a slicing position.

All of the angles except for angles 5 & 6 utilize the hand shape of a hammer fist. Angles 5 and 6 tend to use the open hand.

The Basic Nine Angles of Attack are:

1. Angle 1 is an arcing motion to their temple or where the neck and shoulder meet. The important thing to remember is that your right arm rises from behind your own right sided neck and shoulder area and goes as high as possible before it falls. The angle 1 flows through and finishes behind your left neck and shoulder area.

Angle 1 can also be used to hit through their arm if they are standing in a fists raised like a boxer position.

2. Angle 2 picks up right where Angle 1 left off. Angle 2 is an arcing motion to their temple or where the neck and shoulder meet. The important thing to remember is that your right arm rises from behind your own left sided neck and shoulder area and goes as high as possible before it falls. The angle 2 flows through and finishes behind your right neck and shoulder area.

Angle 2 can also be used to hit through their arm if they are standing in a fists raised like a boxer position.

3. Angle 3 picks up right where Angle 2 left off. Angle 3 goes straight across like a sideways hit to their neck or ribs or kidney, sternum or spine and finishes up behind your left neck and shoulder area again. The difference in your striking height is not determined by the position of your arm as much as it is determined by your legs.

Angle 3 can also be used to hit through their arm if they are standing in a fists raised like a boxer position.

4. Angle 4 picks up right where Angle 3 left off. Angle 4 goes straight across like a sideways hit to their neck or ribs or kidney, sternum or spine and finishes up behind your left neck and shoulder area again. The difference in your striking height is not determined by the position of your arm as much as it is determined by your legs.

Angle 4 can also be used to hit through their arm if they are standing in a fists raised like a boxer position.

Clear’s Silat Vol 2 – DVD Pre-orders

We have almost finished the second Phase 1 DVD. Click Here to Pre-order before Thursday March 4th you will save over 20%.

Phase 1 Vol 2 includes: Class 03 – Habud, Class 04 – Stealing the Energy & Class 05 – Alive Hands.

Apr 23-24 ’10 Intensive Healing (empty force) Chi Kung workshop

  • Title: Intensive Healing (empty force) Chi Kung workshop
  • Location: 113 e Broadway, Maryville TN 37804
  • Workshop Flyer: Chi Kung Healing workshop April 2010 TN.pdf
  • Description: 3 Day Intensive. Secrets of Universal Healing (empty force) Chi Kung.
    Four Workshops in 3 days. Covered will be Absorbing, Building, Emitting, & Healing with chi. Includes sensing, interpreting, balancing, & healing specific injuries & illness with chi. Certification is awarded upon completion of workshops
  • Friday, Saturday, & Sunday, April 22th, 23th, & 24th 2009
  • 10 a.m.- 6 p.m. each day
  • Price:$650 – Before Tue April 20, $725 – on or after April 20.
  • $200 student discount
  • Contact: Richard Clear (865) 379-9997

March 26-28 ’10 Combat Tai Chi Workshop

Dates for the next Combat Tai Chi workshop have been set. Click here to download the flyer

  • Date: March 26, 27 & 28 2010
  • Time: 10am – 6pm each day. There will be a 1.5 hr break for lunch each day.
  • Where: 113 E Broadway Maryville, TN 37804
  • Cost: $495 per person. You must register in advance. Space is limited.
  • Contact: Richard Clear • (865) 379-9997 • rclear@clearstaichi.com

During this workshop we will cover the second part of the Combat Tai Chi program. This is a stand alone workshop. You Do NOT need to have attended previous workshops to attend this one although we recommend studying the “Internal Power” DVD.

You don’t want to miss this event! Participants will receive live hands on instruction and correction for a fraction of the cost of the DVDs. This workshop will contain a lot of the high level hard to find information that many people spend years just trying to find, much less acquire. We highly recommend that you bring a notebook and take a lot of notes. Plus everyone who attends the workshop will receive a 50% discount on the DVDs we film that weekend.

Kun Tao

Kun Tao is an extremely deadly form of  the old hand Kung Fu from the temples and family systems of China.

Today it is primarily found in Indonesia and Malaysia.  The Chinese began migrating to the spice islands in the 1200’s and quickly became the largest immigrant population in Indonesia and Malaysia. As a result the islands became a melting pot of Southeast Asian martial arts including Kun Tao.

Kun Tao is 2 words in Cantonese. The word Kun means fist and the word Tao means way. Together they mean Fist Way or Way of the Fist. In Mandarin the words for Fist Way are Chuan Fa. There are approximately 350 known Kun Tao Styles.

Kun Tao is an art form that due to its deadliness was outlawed in the islands and until the last 85 years or so was very rarely taught to non-Chinese and even only rarely taught to non-family members who were Chinese.

Fortunately by the time World War I ended there was a very large mixing of cultures in Indonesia and Malaysia. The Dutch were the primary European colonists in the area establishing plantations and growing such things as tobacco and coffee.

The main source of trade and money in Malaysia were the Chinese and with the large amount of trade both East and West came people from many different cultures and back grounds and multi-generations of people who intermarried and over the centuries had become part of the culture. As this occurred Kun Tao and Silat began to grow beyond its roots and spread outside of the cultures from which they came.

In 1954 when Sukarno came to full power in Indonesia he forced all people of mixed blood and non-Indos to leave or be beheaded. As a result a number of serious Kun Tao and Silat practitioners who were of mixed Indonesian, Dutch and Chinese descent fled the country and went to Holland, other European countries and eventually the United States. As a result Kun Tao and Silat came to the USA and was taught to Americans starting in the early 1960’s.

Kun Tao can now be found in most major cities in the United States.

Kun Tao techniques tend to be devastating close range explosive techniques utilizing rapid fire blasting strikes and rapid grappling breaks. The old hand street Kung Fu training includes specialty palms and jing expressions as well as animal form training and the internal arts of Hsing-I, Pa Kua / Ba Gua and Tai Chi. The primary commonality of most Kun Tao styles and methods is the lethal nature and unique and unmistakable expressive explosiveness of the Kun Tao arts.